Grow Youthful: How to Slow Your Aging and Enjoy Extraordinary Health
Grow Youthful: How to Slow Your Aging and Enjoy Extraordinary Health

Gum disease, receding gums, gum inflammation (gingivitis)

What are receding gums?

Symptoms of receding gums (gingival recession)

Symptoms of gum inflammation (gingivitis)

Causes of receding gums and gum inflammation (gingivitis/ periodontal disease)

Treatment of receding gums and gingivitis

What are receding gums?

Healthy gums are firm, a pale colour, and cover the roots of the teeth. Normally the lower two thirds of a tooth is buried in the jaw bone.

Receding gums (gingival recession) is a loss of gum tissue causing exposure of the roots of the teeth. Gum recession is a problem that can start in the teens, but is more common in older adults. Gum recession is usually a progressive disorder that happens day-by-day over many years. This is why is more common over the age of 40. Many people do not notice that they have gum recession because it happens so slowly.

Symptoms of receding gums (gingival recession)

Symptoms of gum inflammation (gingivitis)

If the gum recession is caused by gingivitis, the following symptoms may also be present:

In some cases, when gingivitis is treated it reveals a gum recession problem that was previously masked by the gums swelling.

Causes of receding gums and gum inflammation (gingivitis/ periodontal disease)

Treatment of receding gums and gingivitis

Healing receding gums is a slow process that takes at least a few months and possibly much longer. It is best to tackle it in several directions. First and most importantly, your mouth should no longer be an environment in which bacteria thrive. Oral hygiene is essential to stop the growth of more plaque. Harmful bacteria like sugar and a slightly acid environment. So you want your saliva to be slightly alkaline (say pH 7.3), and have no sugar in your mouth.

Try to avoid sugar in all foods and drinks, and refined carbohydrates (foods with white flour etc). When you are on a healthy diet there is no need to clean your teeth after every meal. It is sufficient to clean your teeth once per day in the evening before bed. Always use dental floss, and take time to carefully and gently brush each tooth. Here are details of the most effective brushing technique for your teeth and gums.

Baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) is a good way to raise alkalinity. Take half a teaspoon twice a day in a glass of water on an empty stomach; hold it and swish it in the mouth as long as you can before swallowing. Alternatively, if you are going to continue using this alkaline mouthwash long-term, spit it out after rinsing and holding. You can also brush your teeth with baking soda, or add it to tooth cleaning powder. (If you are using apple cider vinegar, add a little baking soda to it, or rinse with baking soda after drinking it. Never drink neat ACV because it will erode tooth enamel and damage gums).

If there is a high level of bacteria and plaque, check the remedies for improved oral hygiene and raising the pH (alkalinity) in the mouth. These remedies also apply to gingivitis (gum inflammation). Oil pulling and hydrogen peroxide both help with bacterial control.

Sufficient vitamin C, zinc and magnesium are essential for good oral health. One tablespoon of Milk of Magnesia (MgOH) in half a glass of water makes a good mouthwash. Rinse with it but do not drink it. Zinc sulphate (Epsom Salts) may also be used as a mouthwash, but should not be consumed.

The standard dental treatment for gum disease is a thorough cleaning of the teeth and their roots. Scaling is the removal of plaque and tartar from the teeth, and root planing is cleaning the exposed teeth roots. Subgingival curettage is the removal of the surface of the inflamed layer of gum tissue. The latter two of these procedures are usually done with a local anaesthetic, and the dentist may give you oral antibiotics to overcome gum infection or abscess.