Grow Youthful: How to Slow Your Aging and Enjoy Extraordinary Health
Grow Youthful: How to Slow Your Aging and Enjoy Extraordinary Health

Inflammation

What is inflammation?

Causes of inflammation

Symptoms of inflammation

Prevention / remedies / treatment for inflammation

References

What is inflammation?

Inflammation is a healing process. It is caused by assault, injury, infection, poison, trauma or stress to some part of the body. Inflammation is not the cause of any diseases, rather it is the result of these traumas.

Inflammation is the hot, red, swollen, sometimes painful evidence of the immune system at work when there is a toxin, injury or infection. The injured cells send out a variety of chemical hormones that tell white blood cells to come and destroy the invader. They also stimulate the production of various proteins such as fibrin, which wall off the damaged areas. Other white blood cells called phagocytes and macrophages swallow and digest the invaders and damaged cells. After the injury is cleaned up, the inflammation stops, and the repair process starts.

The main protein involved with repair is collagen. Collagen is a strong yet flexible protein, and provides the structure for firm healthy skin, as well as many other body parts.

For many people today, inflammation is continually stimulated, and it continues in a chronic way rather than just being a quick and temporary healing phase. Atherosclerosis is when lesions that do not heal form on the walls of blood vessels (endothelium). Atherosclerotic plaques form like ulcers, covered by a mix of collagen, calcium, dead cells, fibrin, foam cells and damaged (oxidised) fats and cholesterol.

Causes of inflammation

Symptoms of inflammation

Chronic inflammation is a widespread problem affecting the majority of modern Westernised people. It speeds up your aging and makes you sicker and weaker. It affects people of all ages.

Severe and ongoing inflammation in which the immune system is over-activated, can cause inflammatory tissue damage that eventually leads a wide variety of problems such as autism, compromised behavioural development, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn's disease, psoriasis and other autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. In particular, there is a risk of damage to a foetus during pregnancy. Studies in experimental mice show that stimulating the mother's immune system during pregnancy causes offspring with altered gene expression in the brain, problems with behavioural development, and immune system changes and autoimmune disorders. (2)

Prevention / remedies / treatment for inflammation

Stop eating sugar and refined carbohydrates

Processed carbohydrates include breakfast cereal, processed fruit juice, cola, sports drink, bread, cake, crisps, crackers, biscuits, popcorn, pasta, sweets, pastry, batter, jam, condiments, preserved fruits, products made from wheat and flour, and virtually all processed foods because they have added sugar. The Grow Youthful Recipe Book helps you to enjoy an anti-inflammatory diet with a variety of living food and traditional recipes.

Stop polluting your body with chemicals

Processed foods and all the chemicals they contain, "golden" polyunsaturated supermarket cooking oils; soya products; man-made personal care products like toothpastes, deodorants, sunscreens, perfumes, shampoos and most soaps; household cleaning, laundry and chemicals; drugs; smoke; pollution and the chemicals in new carpets, new cars, swimming pools and municipal tap water. Grow Youthful has many ideas for lightening your toxic load. Keep your home as chemical-free as possible, and buy products made from natural ingredients that you understand.

Gum turpentine is a good anti-inflammatory remedy.

See details of remedies recommended by Grow Youthful visitors, and their experience with them.

References

1. Lee JK, Luchian T, Park Y. Effect of Regular Exercise on Inflammation Induced by Drug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus 3089 in ICR mice. Sci Rep. 2015 Nov 6;5:16364. doi: 10.1038/srep16364.

2. Gloria B. Choi, Yeong S. Yim, Helen Wong, Sangdoo Kim, Hyunju Kim, Sangwon V. Kim, Charles A. Hoeffer, Dan R. Littman, Jun R. Huh. The maternal interleukin-17a pathway in mice promotes autismlike phenotypes in offspring. Science. Published online 28 Jan 2016. DOI: 10.1126/science.aad0314.