Grow Youthful: How to Slow Your Aging and Enjoy Extraordinary Health
Grow Youthful: How to Slow Your Aging and Enjoy Extraordinary Health

Progesterone

What is progesterone?

Sources of progesterone

Progesterone in women

Progesterone in men

How to use natural progesterone cream

References

What is progesterone?

Progesterone is a hormone found in men, women and children. Everyone needs a small amount of progesterone for good health and longevity. Women of reproductive age need (and produce) the most. Progesterone plays an essential role in a woman's reproductive cycle and her ability to have children, and if she does not produce enough and has low progesterone many serious problems can occur.

Men also need progesterone for good health and full sexual function. It should be the first hormone that men (and women) use to treat any problems caused by a deficiency or imbalance of sex hormones.

Postmenopausal women and children tend to have the lowest progesterone level and often have a progesterone deficiency. Adult males have a similar progesterone level to that in women during the follicular phase of their menstrual cycle. When a woman ovulates, the level of progesterone in her blood more than doubles. During pregnancy, her progesterone level goes up by one to two hundred times.

Progesterone is not a "feminising" hormone. That reputation belongs to estrogen. Excess estrogen or estrogen-imitators (including many pollutants in the environment) cause a variety of health problems for both men and women. Progesterone is a natural antagonist to estrogen. Progesterone helps to balance and neutralise the powerful effects of excess estrogen in both men and women. Without sufficient progesterone in the body, estrogen becomes harmful and out of control (unopposed estrogen or estrogen dominance).

Progesterone is produced in a woman's body in quantities a thousand-fold greater than estrogens. Progesterone is a pivotal building block for the production of other hormones, including estrogens, glucocorticoids and corticosteroids. Without progesterone there would be no menstrual cycle or reproduction. Progesterone plays an essential role including keeping the stimulatory effects of estrogen under control.

In the 1990's an American medical doctor, John R. Lee, pioneered the use of natural progesterone in treating breast cancer, PMS and menstrual problems. Dr Lee emphasised the use of natural progesterone with its dynamic and holistic properties, and warned doctors to avoid synthetic progesterone look-alikes or analogs, because they were not as effective and have nasty side-effects. Unfortunately many doctors are not aware of this important distinction. Pharmaceutical companies promote only their more profitable patented look-alikes. The best-known look-alikes are various progestins and progestogens.

Progesterone is the only hormone that does not adversely affect infants and children. So if you are using natural progesterone cream there is no need to worry about any rubbing off onto a male or female baby or child - no harm will come. However, synthetic pharmaceutical progesterone look-alikes, testosterone, estrogen and other hormones can cause serious side effects in children.

Sources of progesterone

Progesterone cream

Progesterone in women

Symptoms of low progesterone in women

Benefits of natural progesterone supplementation for women

How to supplement with natural progesterone cream for women

Symptoms of low progesterone in women

Here are the kind of comments that women with progesterone deficiency are making to their partners, friends and doctors:

"I'm just too tired for sex"
"I sleep for 9 hours and still need more"
"Forget the sex, I just wish I had some energy"
"I love him, but I just don't have the energy for sex"
"It's all too much, I don't want to go out tonight"
"My drive and motivation have disappeared"

Benefits of natural progesterone supplementation for women

How to supplement with natural progesterone cream for women


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Progesterone in men

Progesterone and estrogen in men

Symptoms of estrogen dominance / low progesterone in men

Benefits of natural progesterone supplementation for men

How to supplement with natural progesterone cream for men

Progesterone and estrogen in men

Progesterone is known as the "source hormone" and gets converted in the male body into testosterone and other hormones. As men age, their progesterone level drops. This causes testosterone production to fall, and is one reason why older men may have a low testosterone level.

The level of estrogens, estrogen look-alikes and xenoestrogens rises in men's (and women's) bodies as the years go by. Progesterone opposes and balances excess estrogen (and xenoestrogens). It is progesterone that inhibits the harmful effects of too much estrogen (unopposed estrogen) more than anything else. So as estrogen levels rise in older men, there is no parallel rise in progesterone to balance this. A slight hormonal imbalance becomes a major imbalance - fast.

For men progesterone is anti-feminizing rather than being a "female hormone". Any adult man showing these estrogen-dominant symptoms, especially those over 50, should use a small amount of transdermal natural progesterone daily to offset the excess estrogens in his blood.

Progesterone is a powerful 5-alpha reductase inhibitor. 5-alpha reductase is an enzyme that turns beneficial testosterone into unwanted and dangerous dihydrotestosterone (DHT). High levels of DHT are associated with baldness, prostate disease, and a host of other illnesses as men age.

Progesterone raises the level of androstenedione in the prostate gland. A healthy prostate needs an abundance of androgens such as testosterone, androstenedione, and DHEA to function as well as it did in their youth.

A healthy prostate needs a small amount of progesterone, and actually has progesterone receptors. Studies on laboratory animals have reduced the weights of their prostates just by giving them natural progesterone.

Progesterone cream

Progesterone's safety for men is without question. It is now a standard treatment for traumatic brain injury, and over 70% of TBI victims are men. Progesterone is an excellent diuretic and anti-inflammatory, and its use via IV transfusion for brain trauma victims prevents oedema and inflammation that occurs after TBI injury. (24)

Symptoms of estrogen dominance / low progesterone in men

Benefits of natural progesterone supplementation for men

Natural progesterone helps combat or even reverse the symptoms of estrogen dominance in men. As progesterone is a precursor hormone for testosterone, it is increasingly becoming the hormone used to treat prostrate problems and other male hormone imbalance symptoms.

More and more men are putting stigma aside and embracing this natural alternative.

How to supplement with natural progesterone cream for men


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How to use natural progesterone cream

Here are some tips on effective use of progesterone cream for both men and women.

Progesterone cream

References

1. Anasti J. N, Leonetti H.B, Wilson K. J. Topical progesterone creme has antiproliferative effect on estrange-stimulated endometrium. Obstet & Gynecol. 2001. 94(4 Suppl.): 10S and Fertil Steril. 2004. 79 (1): 221-2.

2. Baulieu E., CSchumacher M. Progesterone as a neuroactive neurosteroid, with special reference to the effect of progesterone on myelination. Steroids. 2000. Oct-Nov; 65 (10-11): 605-12.
This paper reviews the effects of progesterone on the brain, with special focus on its role in the formation of the myelin sheath surrounding nerve fibers. Other roles of progesterone in the brain include evaluating activating GABA receptors, which induces a calming effect

3. Cowan L. D., Gordis L., Tonascia J. A., et al. Breast cancer incidence in women with a history of progesterone deficiency. American Journal of Epidemiology. 1981; 114:209.27

4. Dennerstein L., Spencer-Gardner C., Gotts G., Brown J. B., Smith M.A., Burrows G. D. Progesterone and the premenstrual syndrome: a double blind crossover trial. Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) 1985. Jun 1; 290 (6482): 1617-21.

5. Goodman & Gilman. The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics. 6th edition, 1980: Chapter 61 (Estrogens and Progestins: 1420), 1085-1171

6. Lee, D. R. M.D. Osteoporosis reversal: the role of progesterone. Intern Clin Nutr Rev 10: 384-91. 1990.

7. Lee, D. R. M.D. Is natural progesterone the missing link in osteoporosis prevention and treatment? Medical Hypotheses 35:316-18. 1991.

8. Lee, D. R. M.D. Natural Hormones for Men: What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Prostate Health and Natural Hormone Supplementation. Hormones Etc. p. 5-24. 2003.

9. Lee, John R. Natural Progesterone - The Multiple Roles of a Remarkable Hormone. 1993.

10. Lee, John R. What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About PREmenopause. 1999.

11. Lee, John R. What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Breast Cancer. 2002.

12. Lee, John R. Hormone Balance for Men. 2003.

13. Lee, John R. What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Menopause. 2004.

14. Lee, John R. Hormone Balance Made Simple. 2006.

15. Leonetti H.B., Longo S., Anasti J. N. Transdermal progesterone cream for vasomotor symptoms and postmenopausal bone loss. Obstet Gynecol 1990. Aug; 94(2): 225-8.

16. Mauvais-Jarivs P., Kuttenn F, Gompel A. Antiestrogen action of progesterone in breast tissue. Horm Res. 1987. 28 (2-4): 212-8.28

17. Prior, J.C. Progesterone as a bone-trophic hormone. Endocr Rev 11:386-98. 1990.

18. Prior, J.C., Y. M. Vigna, and N. Alojado. Progesterone and the prevention of osteoporosis. Candian Journal of Obstetrics/Gynecology & Women's Health Care 3:178-84. 1991.

19. Rylance P. B., Brincat M., Lafferty K., De Trafford J. C., Brincat S., Parsons V., Studd J. W. Natural Progesterone and antihypertensive action. Br Med J (Clinical Res Ed) 1985. Jan 5; 290 (6461): 13-4.

20. Stevenson, J. C., K. F. Ganger, et al. Effects of transdermal versus oral hormone replacement therapy on bone density in spine and proximal femur in postmenopausal women. Lancet 336: 256-26. 1990.

21. Sherwin B. B. Progesterone use in menopause. Side-effects, mood and quality of life. J. Reprod Med. Feb; 44(2 Suppl): 227-32. 1999.

22. Kent Holtorf. Bio-identical vs synthetic hormones. Postgraduate Medicine, Volume 121, issue 1, January 2009, issn - 0032-5481, e-issn - 1941-9260 9.

23. Parr RA, Davis IF, Miles MA, Squires TJ. Liver blood flow and metabolic clearance rate of progesterone in sheep. Res Vet Sci. 1993 Nov;55(3):311-6. Article

24. Janet Christenbury.
Progesterone Shows Promise as Treatment for Traumatic Brain Injury. Emory University, Woodruff Health Sciences Center, 2 October 2006. Article

25. Jeffrey D. Blaustein. Progesterone and Progestin Receptors in the Brain: The Neglected Ones. Endocrinology June 1, 2008 vol. 149 no. 6 2737-2738.

26. Andersen ML, Bignotto M, Tufik S. Hormone treatment facilitates penile erection in castrated rats after sleep deprivation and cocaine. J Neuroendocrinol. 2004 Feb;16(2):154-9.